Meetings/Workshops on Molecular Biology in Italy

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1.
 
Zomes IX — Zomes IX Conference 2017
ID
845292
Dates
14 Feb 2017 - 17 Feb 2017
Location
Rome, Italy
Abstract
ZOMES IX focuses on the role of Zome complexes (Proteasome, COP9 signalosome, eIF3) and the ubiquitin-proteasome system in the regulation of protein homeostasis.
Contact
Laura Matteini;     Phone: [+39 0266203390];     Email: zomes@newaurameeting.it
Topics
molecular biology, cellular biology, biochemistry, plant science, protein-protein interactions, proteostasis, protein homeostasis, autophagy, apoptosis, proteasome, ubiquitin, crystallography, protein structure, small molecules, inhibitors, protein synthesis, post-translational controls, mass spectrometry, proteomics, aging, cancer, neurodegeneration
Related subject(s)
Event website
2.
 
Neuroinflammation
ID
857870
Dates
06 May 2017 - 13 May 2017
Location
Siena, Italy
Abstract
The last two decades have seen a revolutionary change in the dogma suggesting that the CNS operates optimally without any assistance from circulating immune cells. Previously, attempts were made to globally mitigate any immune activity in the brain, assuming such activity was a sign of ongoing pathology. We now know that a continuous dialogue occurs between the brain and the circulation, and that soluble and cellular components derived from the circulation support brain plasticity. The implications of these finding for brain aging and neurodegenerative diseases are becoming critical issues in finding cures for these conditions. Moreover, the mechanisms whereby the brain controls the activity of the immune system is an additional mystery in this bi-directional relationship. The Advanced Course will feature contributions by scientists who have made fundamental contributions to understanding this evolving new field.
Contact
Francesca Martini;     Phone: [+39.0577.146.0003];     Email: info@nsas.it
Related subject(s)
3.
 
EMBO Workshop — Second signalling and endomembranes
ID
817688
Dates
08 May 2017 - 12 May 2017
Location
Santa Margherita di Pula, Italy
Topics
Signal Transduction | Membranes & Transport
4.
 
Chronic Pain: Plasticity and Therapeutic Perspectives
ID
857968
Dates
13 May 2017 - 20 May 2017
Location
Siena, Italy
Abstract
Accumulating evidence points to brain reorganization with chronic pain. It seems that the grey matter of the neocortex dynamically changes with chronic pain and this reorganization is pain type specific. In parallel to the anatomical changes, brain functional properties change as well, and the best evidence for condition type functional reorganization is now documented in resting state brain activity, where one can identify a core set of brain networks commonly disturbed with chronic pain, as well as condition specific functional properties. Moreover, brain functional network properties provide a signature for existence and for emergence of chronic pain both in humans as well as in rodent models for pain chronification. It is common clinical knowledge that although a very large patient population presents with similar injuries that give rise to pain, only a small minority of them develop chronic pain. Thus the critical question in the field of pain research is: what characteristics differentiate between those that develop chronic pain and the ones who properly recover from their injury into health. Complimenting the human study there is now evidence in animal models regarding brain reorganization with pain chronification.
Contact
Francesca Martini;     Phone: [+39.0577.146.0003];     Email: info@nsas.it
Related subject(s)
5.
 
Neural Stem Cells: Development and Brain Repair
ID
857923
Dates
20 May 2017 - 27 May 2017
Location
Siena, Italy
Abstract
A number of neurological diseases are characterized by the loss of individual neuronal subtypes and/or specialized glial cells. The ongoing effort is to understand the underlying pathophysiology in an attempt to identify suitable drug targets. Opportunities have emerged within the stem cell field. Unprecedented advances have been made in our understanding of stem cells and through them much can be learned about the physiology and pathophysiology of the cells that degenerate in different brain disorders with the ultimate goal of delivering therapeutically relevant stem cells that could ameliorate the clinical outcome. The Advanced Course will bring together a collection of investigators who are at the forefront of their field and will showcase research at the frontiers of neural stem cells for neurorepair.
Contact
Francesca Martini;     Phone: [+39.0577.146.0003];     Email: info@nsas.it
Related subject(s)
6.
 
Learning and Memory: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms
ID
857977
Dates
28 May 2017 - 04 Jun 2017
Location
Siena, Italy
Abstract
Recent ground-breaking developments in neuroscience, such as optogenetics, in vivo 2-photon confocal microscopy, head mounted microscopes, powerful new developments in modeling, behavioral neuroscience approaches, and sophisticated brain imaging tools, have changed dramatically studies of memory. Most importantly, these developments have fostered interdisciplinary studies that led to integrated molecular, cellular, systems, cognitive and behavioral explanations of how memories are allocated, formed, consolidated, reconsolidated and retrieved. These studies have also led to mechanistic cross-disciplinary studies of memory disorders, which in some cases led to the development of targeted treatments that are changing how we imagine treating the considerable health burden associated with this large class of conditions.
Contact
Francesca Martini;     Phone: [+39.0577.146.0003];     Email: info@nsas.it
Related subject(s)
7.
 
International School of Crystallography 50th Course: Integrative Structural Biology
ID
865371
Dates
02 Jun 2017 - 11 Jun 2017
Location
Erice (Sicily), Italy
8.
 
2nd DNA Replication as a Source of DNA Damage Conference
ID
814159
Dates
03 Jul 2017 - 06 Jul 2017
Location
Rome, Italy
Abstract
The maintenance of genome integrity is critical for the suppression of cancer and premature ageing. Only recently has it become appreciated that DNA replication stress is a crucial driver of genomic instability. The timely progression of replisomes can be disrupted by lesions and secondary structures in the template, by bound proteins and by conflicts with the transcription machinery. A prolonged pause of the replisome then exposes single stranded DNA, which, due to its recombinogenic nature, can lead to genome rearrangements, fragile site expression and cell death. Importantly, some cancers present excessive endogenous levels of replication stress, which can be exploited for their clearance. In this conference, we aim to bring together scientists studying DNA replication and repair, with those interested in how DNA damage can influence cancer and ageing.
Contact
Laura Trundle;     Email: laura@fusion-conferences.com
Topics
DNA Replication, DNA Damage, Cancer, Ageing
Related subject(s)
9.
 
Neuroepigenetics and Epitranscriptomics
ID
868350
Dates
19 Aug 2017 - 26 Aug 2017
Location
Siena, Italy
Abstract
Many cellular constituents in the human brain permanently exit from the cell cycle during pre- or early postnatal development, but little is known about epigenetic regulation of neuronal and glial epigenomes during maturation and aging, including changes in cognitive and psychiatric disease. Normal brain development and function is dependent on highly regulated mechanisms governing DNA cytosine methylation and hydroxymethylation, and probably more than 100 residue-specific histone modifications associated with gene expression and silencing and various other functional chromatin states. Equally important is the 3-dimensional organization of the chromosomal material inside the cell nucleus, commonly referred to as the ‘3D Genome’, with chromosomal loopings potentially bypassing hundreds of kilobases on the linear genome to enable promoter-enhancer interactions and other mechanisms important for transcriptional regulation. Combined exploration of epigenomic and 3D genome chromosomal conformation maps maps is likely to illuminate the role of regulatory non-coding sequences in neuropsychiatric disease.
Contact
Francesca Martini;     Phone: [+39.0577.146.0003];     Email: info@nsas.it
10.
 
Synaptic and Structural Plasticity
ID
868448
Dates
26 Aug 2017 - 02 Sep 2017
Location
Siena, Italy
Abstract
Different forms of synaptic plasticity occurring at the molecular, cellular and circuit level are the focus of this Advanced Course. The Course will start with critical analysis of the evolution of the study of various forms of long-term potentiation and long-term depression and what is generally accepted about their basic mechanisms, including a discussion of modern approaches to understanding the mechanisms and functions of synaptic plasticity. A wide range of areas will be covered, including: (a) the molecular mechanisms underlying different forms of short-term synaptic facilitation and depression that last no more than a few minutes and are typically mediated by presynaptic mechanisms that alter neurotransmitter release (b) the function of key postsynaptic proteins found in the postsynaptic density as well as the role of neurotransmitter receptor regulation during long-term synaptic and experience-dependent plasticity (c) the methodological approaches that have been recently developed to measure the dynamic localization of synaptic elements at nanoscale resolution and how these nanoscale morphological and functional properties regulate synapses (d) the role of neurogenesis throughout life as a crucial mechanism underlying learning-induced circuits in the dentate gyrus and the olfactory bulb (e) how these forms of plasticity integrate to result in the restructuring of entire neuronal circuits. Participation in the Advanced Course will provide an essential conceptual and methodological framework for anyone intending to pursue rigorous research. The advantages and disadvantages of each method, preparation and recording technique are considered in relation to the specific scientific questions being asked. The Advanced Course will not only develop participants’ skill but will also provide plenty of time for informal gatherings with some of the world leaders in synaptic plasticity, designed to foster brainstorming across different disciplines.
Contact
Francesca Martini;     Phone: [+39.0577.146.0003];     Email: info@nsas.it
11.
 
Cognitive Decine and Aging
ID
868414
Dates
01 Sep 2017 - 08 Sep 2017
Location
Siena, Italy
Abstract
Age is the greatest risk factor for multiple neurodegenerative diseases. In that context, the prevailing perception of the aging brain is of linear decline across multiple systems. A diametrically different perspective is that the aging brain is a dynamic adaptive organ that initiates multiple survival systems throughout the aging process. While these adaptations in the aging brain are for the majority of persons beneficial, they can, in vulnerable populations, lead to increased risk of neurodegenerative disease. The systems biology of transition states in normal aging and neurodegeneration provides insights into mechanisms of disease risk and disease progression. Risk of multiple neurodegenerative diseases can emerge during neuroendocrine transitions of aging when gene networks undergo shifts in activation and expression. These risk networks underlie the prodromal phase of neurodegenerative disease. Later, transition states typify the progressive nature of multiple neurodegenerative diseases. Risk for and progression of Alzheimer’s disease are exemplars of both risk that can emerge during neuroendocrine transitions and the transition states of disease progression.
Contact
Francesca Martini;     Phone: [+39.0577.146.0003];     Email: info@nsas.it
Related subject(s)
12.
 
Single Cell Omics
ID
868479
Dates
17 Sep 2017 - 24 Sep 2017
Location
Siena, Italy
Abstract
Neuroscience has entered a critical phase, with several international large-scale efforts devoted to the analysis and understanding of brain function. Studies exploiting new technologies for defining the connections in the brain, driving neuronal activity and modeling of neuronal processing are each hampered by our incomplete knowledge of the brain’s constituent parts. Fortunately, a bevy of single cell analyses are now being deployed to better understand the cells that constitute the functioning nervous system. These approaches offer insights into how cells function individually as the building blocks for understanding how they work in ensemble to create functional pathways. A set of emerging tools are available to assess the molecular and cell biology of single cells, including genomic analyses of somatic mutations, epigenomics to explain the influence of the environment upon genome expression, and transcriptomics to gain insight into the capacity of a cell to synthesize proteins and modulate its environment. Powerful technologies permit a variety of cell constituents to be addressed, including proteins, post-translational modifications, peptides and metabolites. Novel biosensors offer parallel analyses of cellular physiological states, reporting on the pH, membrane voltage and metabolic state. Multiplexed together, such methodologies offer a far more complete biological understanding than the more typical gene expression analyses, providing a rich picture of each single cell’s biology in their normal context – information needed to fully interpret the meaning of results from transcriptomics and proteomics studies.This Advanced Course is designed to provide the foundational knowledge needed to critically evaluate the design and execution of single cell omic studies, through daily lectures by the Faculty, critical reading of papers and extensive didactic discussion sessions. In the sessions, discussion will focus on the proper framing of scientific questions to best utilize these techniques, the limitations and advantages of each technique, and what the data can tell us about neuronal function.
Contact
Francesca Martini;     Phone: [+39.0577.146.0003];     Email: info@nsas.it
13.
 
The Neuroscience of Obesity
ID
868434
Dates
17 Sep 2017 - 24 Sep 2017
Location
Siena, Italy
Abstract
Significant progress has been made in recent years in the understanding the role of the nervous system in obesity. Not only several different neuronal pathways, neurotransmitters and hormones have been identified as major players in the regulation of feeding and body weight, bu also energy balance in mammals is controlled by a complex network of interacting feedback mechanisms that involve peripheral organs in addition to higher brain centers. This Advanced Course will provide conceptual- and cutting edge technological framework for state-of-the-art of neuroscience on energy metabolism. The Faculty represents diverse expertise in molecular, cellular, circuit and behavioral approaches on contemporary questions regarding the role of the brain in systemic metabolism regulation and how the periphery affects complex brain functions via neuronal circuits and brain cells.
Contact
Francesca Martini;     Phone: [+39.0577.146.0003];     Email: info@nsas.it
Related subject(s)

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Last updated: 07 January 2017